empty checkboxes and one blue survey checkmark

Insights into consumers’ purchasing habits and opinions are bread and butter for any company in today’s busy world. Every single brand needs serious and thorough understanding of their potential customers. Sometimes, companies can find volunteers who are willing to participate in a research just for the thrill of making an influence. But more often than not, they have to offer a small incentive to reach a larger audience. That’s where market research companies come in, with their survey panels such as Survey Club. And that’s where you and me come in too, as users who are willing to trade their opinions for a small reimbursement. So, this review should help you decide if the platform is worth your time.

Survey Club was founded back in 2005, which makes it one of the older market research companies out there. At least when it comes to the online world. Based in Denver, Colorado, they accept respondents from US, Canada, Australia, and UK. They mostly conduct online surveys and occasionally focus groups, and reward the participants with cash or Amazon gift cards.

How Does Survey Club Work?

All legitimate survey panels are free to join, and Survey Club doesn’t disappoint in that regard. You will never be charged any fees for joining. Plus, the signup process is swift and easy. Upon filling in your basic info, you will be prompted to complete your profile with employment and income info. Also, there’s a short questionnaire about your health and lifestyle.

Trouble begins with the third step. It shows that this survey panel doesn’t operate independently. Rather, it relies on third party survey sites for consistent supply. Here’s what it means in practice. If you want to increase your earning potential, you should sign up with at least three other panels, including Ipsos I-Say, Opinion Outpost, National Consumer Panel, and E-Poll. These are all legit panels that can really help you make some money on the side. Joining them is not obligatory. But if you don’t do it, your earning opportunities will basically reduce to the lowest paying general opinion and consumer opinion surveys.

There’s more on this matter. Even if you don’t join any of these panels straight away, most surveys will automatically redirect you to them, forcing you to sign up nonetheless. So, Survey Club seems to be an intermediary (maybe even subsidiary) that was set up to send more traffic their way, while having next to none in-house surveys.

survey club homepage preview

How Much Can I Earn?

Not unlike most of their competitors, Survey Club doesn’t offer huge reimbursement. On average, you will make anywhere from 50¢ to $5 per survey. The longer a survey is, the more it will pay. But of course, you will rarely receive these longer surveys. In other words, don’t expect this platform to pay your bills.

When it comes to focus groups, they are the rarest and most alluring earning opportunities. In most cases, you will earn a couple dozen dollars for them. But sometimes, they will pay even a couple hundred bucks. I’ve even found reports of complex clinical research studies that people did in exchange for whopping $1,000. I can’t confirm that, since I never got such an invitation. But nevertheless, I decided to mention that for the sake of complete honesty.

Most survey panels are notorious for the issue of eligibility, and this one is no different. If you only take their own surveys (up to six per day), you will quickly learn that it’s hard to qualify. Sure, there are other survey panels that they recommend. But you can sign up for those on your own, without the need to click through their links, right?

The cashout threshold is $25, which doesn’t sound like much, but is actually pretty difficult to amass. You would need 50 of the most common 50¢ surveys to earn that much. And that’s only if you manage to qualify for all of them.

survey club tasks preview page

Pros

  • Rewards include cash and Amazon gift cards. Those two rewards are by far most attractive.
  • Focus groups pay very well. The possibility to earn up to $200 for a one-hour focus group is hard to disregard, even if it happens very rarely. Not to mention the (unproved) claims about $1,000 clinical researches.
  • It’s a legitimate survey site. The contact information is clearly listed on their website, which is a practice that scammers always avoid. Also, users claim that their customer service is spotless.

Cons

  • The panel is just a mediator. From what I’ve seen, it only works as a traffic hub, and earns via commissions that they get from reputable survey sites such as Inbox Dollars, whenever someone gets there through their link. Strictly speaking, there’s nothing wrong with that. But from the users’ point of view, why would you sign up with a survey panel that only redirects you to other panels? It’s a hassle, and unnecessary one at that.
  • It’s very hard to qualify for their surveys. Even though they are short and easy, what good are they if you never seem to be eligible?
  • Most (meaning: almost all) of their surveys will pay very low. If you somehow manage to climb over the eligibility wall, it won’t be very worth your while. Here’s a typical scenario: you will waste half an hour before managing to qualify for your first successful survey. And then, you will earn $0.50. I bet your time is worth way more than that.
  • Get ready for lots of emails. In fact, it would be best to register with an email address that you don’t use for any other purposes. Most of the emails you’ll get won’t be worth a dime anyway.

Conclusion

This panel is definitely legit, but most of the time you would spend on it will prove to be wasted. So, here’s how to find a middleground. Sign up, but don’t pay any attention to their surveys. You can even set up an email filter to automatically archive all of their emails containing the word “survey”.

Those coveted focus groups are the only thing worth your time here. Should you receive any invitations to them, feel free to accept. As for surveys, there are many panels that are way better, more consistent and reliable.